Scott Frost-Wood River

Athlete- 2019  (1993)

From the shot put to hurdles, whether on the basketball court or football field, Scott Frost could do it all. A Parade All-American quarterback, Frost set state records with more than 11,000 yards and 67 touchdown passes in his career. He also had 79 rushing touchdowns and six returns for touchdowns. On the basketball court, he scored more than 1,000 points. In track, he threw the shot put 61 feet and ran the high hurdles in 14.5 seconds, winning State Meet gold medals in both events. Frost’s college football career started at Stanford, but ended with his final two years leading Nebaska to a 24-2 record and a National Championship. He went on to play defensive back for seven years in the NFL before embarking on a successful collegiate coaching career that included National Coach of the Year Honors, before returning in 2018 to coach the Nebraska Cornhusker Football Team.

Larry Frost- Malcolm

 

 

Athlete- 2019  (1965)

When Tom Osborne scouted an eight man player at Malcolm and saw him score six touchdowns in six carries, he knew Larry Frost was special.  Frost set national records scoring 121 touchdowns and 765 points in his high school career, including nine touchdowns in a game.  He was the first eight-man player to earn Player of the game honors in the Shrine Bowl.  A versatile athlete earning 12 athletic letters at Malcolm, he is believed to be the school’s all-time leading scorer in basketball.  He also won three silver medals in the 100-yard dash and placed in the 220 and 440 at the State Track Meet.  At Nebraska, he was a two-year starter at wingback before becoming a successful high school coach.

A. Hubert “Hub” Foster- York

Contributor

From the mid-1950s to the 1970s, no one was more dedicated to the promotion of York High school athletics than “Hub” Foster.  As Sports Editor of the York News times, Foster became a local icon, committing countless hours to covering York High, York St. Joseph, York college and several high schools in the York area, writing with passion and a sense of community.  A 1935 York High graduate, Foster announced numerous sporting events in the area using his own public address system.  A civic leader, Foster served on the York City Council, boosting youth activities and efforts to improve city parks, the sports complex, swimming pool and tennis courts.  After his retirement, Foster continued to write articles for the paper until his death in 2013 at the age of 95.

Leodis Flowers-Omaha Central

Omaha Central (Class of 1987)
One of a string of standouts who gave Omaha Central the nickname, “I-Back High,” Flowers earned Parade All-American honors and was one of eight finalists for Gatorade National Player of the Year as a senior. A two-time all-state running back, he rushed for 1,800 yards as a junior and 1,200 yards and 19 touchdowns in seven games his senior year. His six touchdowns in a game set a Class A record. Also a member of Central’s gold-medal-winning 400-meter relay, Flowers used his athletic skills to rush for more than 1,600 yards in his 3-year career at Nebraska, putting together a string of six 100-yard games in 1990.

John Faiman Jr. – Bellevue West

2013 InducteeCoach

Lauded for building character and producing teams that played beyond their potential and rose to high levels of competition, John Faiman made his mark on countless athletes through a 48-year career that included 38 years as a head football coach at David City (4 years), McCook (2), Omaha South (6) and Bellevue West (26). His career also included 10 years as a college assistant coach at Washington State, Missouri, Utah and Kansas State. His Omaha South team claimed a Metro  Conference title and he led Bellevue West to an undefeated (9-0) regular season. At Bellevue West, his teams qualified for the playoffs in nine of 10 years, and in 2011, at age 70, he was believed to be the oldest head coach to take a team to the playoffs. A high school All-American quarterback, he started for the Nebraska Cornhuskers in Coach Bob Devaney’s first game as head coach, but a broken leg in practice ended his playing career.  

 

Gerald Ferguson – Scottsbluff

 ATHLETE

Because Gerald was one of the most recognized athletes of his era, people came to games just to watch him play. An “every-sport standout,” Gerald W. Ferguson led Scottsbluff High School to an undefeated season and the mythical state football title in 1945. All-State in football for two years and All Big Ten in basketball twice, he also won the Class A long jump and placed in the shot put at the state track meet. At Nebraska he was a three-year football letterman playing halfback. He coached high school sports at Fairbury and in California until retiring in 1988.


 

Kelly Flynn – South Sioux City

COACH 

Kelly Flynn built a girls basketball dynasty at South Sioux City, ruling Class B for more than a decade, winning 11 state championships – 10 in the 11 years from 1995 to 2005. The Cardinals finished second in 1999. Flynn coached at South Sioux City for 27 years, piling up 508 career wins and 17 state tournament appearances. The Cardinals were nationally ranked for eight years, earning a No. 1 ranking in USA Today in 2001. Flynn was named national Coach of the Year in 2012 and was a national Coach of the Year runner-up in 2003. He coached in the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association All-American Game in 2003 in Atlanta and the McDonald’s All-American Game in 2005 in Indiana.

 

 

 

Cletus Fischer – Lincoln

HOF inducteeCoach/Athlete. This well-known member of the famous Nebraska Fischer family of athletes was a fine athlete himself, reaching all-state status as a halfback in 1942 in six-man football for St. Edward High School. Also a member of the Cornhusker teams of the 1940s, he played professional football for the New York Giants in 1949. As a high school coach he did well at Columbus St. Bonaventure, but reached the top when coaching the Omaha South High School Packers of 1958 to an undefeated season on the gridiron with one tie with the state co-champion. Most auspicious was his coaching at the college level, a 26-year coaching career on Nebraska’s staff, building the offensive line for the 1970-71 national championship teams.

Pat Fischer – Omaha Westside

HOF inducteeAthlete. Omaha Westside Class of 1957.  The youngest sibling of Nebraska’s most famous athletic family, Pat Fischer was a great high school athlete, gaining football all-state honors in 1956. At Nebraska, his big plays sometimes were the highlights of the season, especially a punt return which beat Penn State, 7-6.

Fischer made his athletic mark in the National Football League, playing 17 years and starting a then record 212 straight games, playing cornerback for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1961 to 1967, and the Washington Redskins from 1968 to 1977.

Fischer joined the NFL as the 17th-round draft choice of St. Louis in the 1961 NFL Draft. He then signed with Washington as a free agent in 1968. He was a 1969 Pro Bowler. Fischer then helped lead the Redskins to Super Bowl VII in 1972. He finished his 17-year career with 56 interceptions, and ranked seventh all-time in Redskins career interceptions with 27 and fourth all-time with 412 career interception return yards. At the time of his retirement Pat Fischer had played in 213 NFL games, then a record for a cornerback.  During his NFL career,  Pat Fischer was well known to opposing teams as a vicious hitter and a tremendous competitor, despite the reputation as an affable person off the field.

In the late 1980’s, NFL Films named Fischer as the Redskins All-Time Netrulizer sponsored by Tums. After retiring from the Redskins, Fischer worked as a stockbroker and owned a successful real estate business.

 

Charlie Foster – Kearney

HOF inducteeCoach/Contributor--Much of the excellent reputation of the University of Nebraska at Kearney (formerly known as Kearney State) as a great track college is due to the efforts of this fine coach. Prior to his rendezvous with destiny at the county seat of Buffalo County, he coached at Clay Center High School and Ansley High School. Beginning in 1945, Coach Charlie Foster began building the athletic fortunes of Kearney State, at one time coaching football, basketball and track. Under his guidance Kearney had 16 track & field championship teams. He also hosted high school invitational and state championship track and cross country events at the Kearney facility.  According to the University of Nebraska-Kearney Hall of Fame, Coach Foster was the “Father of Nebraska cross country”. He featured girls’ track events in meets before the sport was approved by the state and was the first to add the triple jump. The college’s football field bears his name, Foster Field.